Would you wear fruits and veggies -2?


If you can’t eat it, don’t put it on your skin


(2/2 – This article is in two parts)

5. Fruitleather

Koen Meerkerk (23) and Hugo de Boon (23) are a Rotterdam based designer duo, recently graduated from the Willem de Kooning academy in Rotterdam. With a passion for creating value to things which have been labelled useless, the duo has placed themselves in todays circular economy. Facing and solving problems from a designer’s point of view.

These graduates of the Willem de Kooning Academie in Holland decided to collect the unsold fruit from their local farmersmarkets. They then de-seed, puree, boil and dry the fruit out into thin leather sheets. From this, they create stylish pumpkin-strawberry handbags and peach lampshades.

Farmers tend to leave up to 40% of their harvest in the fields, because it does not meet the cosmetic standards for the supermarkets. Deforestation occurs frequently so that food can be grown which does meet the needs of this cosmetic standard.
In developed countries there are different reasons why produced food for the consumer is wasted. This is often due to the fact that the consumer has bought to much, or because retailers reject the food because of its appearance. 10% of all greenhouse gasses in rich countries is emitted by producing food that will never be eaten.

Using an eco-friendly process which they developed, the discarded fruit is transformed to sheets of leather-like material. In order to really get the leather look, a final finishing is applied. The Fruitleather can be coated or embedded with a print before being applied to a large variety of products which tend to use traditional leather.
Process which involves mashing, cooking and drying, is a lot cleaner then the process that traditional leather undergoes. Using natural materials, final product is a lot less harmful to both the environment and animals.

6.  Nettles: For Tea and Fabric
Using nettles to make fabric is nothing new. Nettle fibers have been found in burial sites in Denmark that date back to the Bronze Age. In Europe, Camira Fabrics, a textile firm in Yorkshire, is known for bringing those nettle fibers back. Thanks to a partnership with De Montfort University they worked to develop a fabric made partly with the crop that most consider a weed.

nettle fabrics

The resulting fabric is called Sting, made with 25% nettles and 75% wool and is certified 100% biodegradable. Now Camira has expanded that fabric into three different lines. While their fabrics are mainly intended for upholstery, nettle fabric has already been used in the fashion world, most notably by Dutch brand Brennels.

Bio Trimmings copy

The resulting fabric is called Sting, made with 25% nettles and 75% wool and is certified 100% biodegradable. Now Camira has expanded that fabric into three different lines. While their fabrics are mainly intended for upholstery, nettle fabric has already been used in the fashion world, most notably by Dutch brand Brennels.

7.

food and fashion

Don’t Cry Over Spilled Milk, Wear It!
Around the world, over a billion tons of food gets wasted every year, which is why a lot of individuals and companies have started to take a look at how we can better put food waste to use, instead of just taking it to the landfill. Germany’s QMilk targeted milk, not the drinkable stuff, but the milk that has gone off and gets tossed in the trash instead. In Germany alone, almost 2 million tons of milk is thrown out. Developing a biopolymer from the milk protein casein, QMilk makes both a fabric, which has a silky feel and is 100% biodegradable, as well as a line of natural cosmetics from its bioplastic.

8.  Orange Fiber

Another juicy start-up can be found in Italy. Sicilian-born Adriana Santanocito has created a soft, sustainable textile out of citrus waste. Orange Fiber aims to put the 700,000 tons of waste created by the orange juice industry to good use.

Winner of an Ideas for Change Award from the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe.  They envision a new life for these materials, transforming them into refined, ethereal fabrics perfectly suited to Italian tradition of high-quality fabrics and high fashion.

As of today, world’s first and only brand to produce a patented material from citrus juice byproducts, repurposing them to create beautiful, sensorial materials that reshape your sartorial experience.

Fabrics are formed from a silk-like cellulose yarn that can blend with other materials. When used in its purest form, the resulting 100% citrus textile features a soft and silky hand-feel, lightweight, and can be opaque or shiny according to production needs

9. Coffee Grounds:

Coffee is not just a beverage – for many of us, it’s a way of life. But the innovative team at Singtex have taken this one step further and learned how to spin coffee into cloth.

Singtex invented the S.Café® eco-friendly coffee yarn in 2008. Made from plastic bottles and coffee grounds, this green, high-tech yarn is environmentally friendly, de-odorizing, and fast drying, UV-resistant and has many different applications. When applied to textile fibers it enhances their functionality without affecting dye performance.

No solvents are used in the production process. Nor does it require the high-temperature carbonizing treatment of conventional carbonized materials. This reduces CO2 emissions by around 2.7 kg. The technology has since been recognized by the top three invention awards in the world. (Gold and Merit Award at INPEX in Pittsburg, USA; Gold medal at iENA Nuremberg; Gold and Special award at the International Exhibitions of Inventions Geneva)

Apart from the development of eco-friendly products they invested into the construction of a precision environmentally friendly dyeing center. Green construction was incorporated into plant construction to meet the requirements of environmentally friendly design from the selection of energy supply to the selection of dyes.

This series of textiles incorporate humidity regulation, odor-control, anti-UV, fast-drying and cool-wear technologies. General applications include sports clothing, outdoor recreation clothing, home clothing, casual clothing, underwear, bed ware and accessories

 

Resources:

The Project

http://orangefiber.it/en/collections/

Main image: pixabay.com

https://bkaccelerator.com/9-cool-projects-where-sustainable-food-and-fashion-come-t

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